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Facebook Scams

with 5 comments

[ Update -> Facebook have had a change of policy and most of the scams are now gone ]

Facebook seem to be happy to take money from just about anyone, I have seen literally hundreds of scams advertised at me on the Facebook site.

I have been telling them about these adverts for months but still they persist in allowing them to be shown. Surely knowing they are scams and continuing to show the ads make Facebook complicit in the scam?

Terms and Conditions

In Facebook’s advertising terms and conditions it explicitly states that scams are prohibited content, but there the fraudulent adverts are…. maybe FB just don’t care?

Just for fun I tried to add to an advert to this page from FB warning people of scams on FB, five minutes or so later I got the following message:

Upon reviewing your account, we have determined that one or more of your ads do not meet our guidelines.

… seems they think it is fine to break their own rules but I’m not allowed to, that it is fine to advertise scams on Facebook but not fine to try to warn people about them. I’ll be trying different strategies, see if I can run anti-facebook adverts on Facebook.

Examples:

Here are six practically identical “Google Kit” adverts on Facebook:

  • www.richstudent.net/ (scam)
  • www.dustinsdollars.com/ (scam)
  • www.nickgetsgreen.com/ (scam)
  • www.nicksgreen.com/ (scam)
  • www.darrylgotpaid.com/ (scam)
  • www.jasonmakesmoney.com/ (scam)

… which all click, through a tracker, to a third-party scam site. Presumably the middle man, the guy who placed the advert on Facebook, gets a commission for each person conned.

FB ads are expensive so someone must be making a lot of money!

Frankly you would have have your eyes shut to fall for some of these, however hundreds of people must do just that all the time because Facebook advertising is actually very expensive… unless your making good money from the advert that is.

Facebook adverts are either pay-per-click or pay-per-impression, as an advertiser you place bids on your adverts, the higher you bid the more likely your advert is to be shown… these scam adverts are on my Facebook all the time, so I can only presume the con-men are bidding quite high to have them there.

Google Kits

Several, but not all, of the sites listed above forward you on to the “eMillionaire” site, your “free” guide to making money from Google turns out to cost $1.95 for “shipping & handling” but, however you read the small print it says:

By clicking the order button, I am ordering the eMillionaire Money System and trial membership for $1.95 s&h, after the 7 day trial I will be charged $39.95 a month thereafter if I do not cancel….

So it will actually cost you $40 a month, not free and not $1.95. Presumably this is somehow legal, it is blatantly designed to deceive but because it does not lie to you it is somehow deemed as fair… it is a bit like telling someone you are going to punch them before you do it, is is still wrong to punch them… some American law makes no sense to me, but that is another rant altogether.

Other Scams on Facebook:

There are loads more scams advertising on Facebook, the more I look the more I find, something like 50% of the adverts I see on the site are obvious scams.

  • government bailout grant kits (same scam as described above)
  • anti ageing products
  • hair loss pills
  • weight loss pills
  • Google Cash Starter Kits (nothing to do with Google)
  • HHO conversions (don’t get me started on this scam!)

Written by Jon

February 10th, 2009 at 9:52 pm

Posted in Miscellaneous

Tagged with , ,

5 Responses to 'Facebook Scams'

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  1. hello there, do you know of any that are not actually scams and offer the chance to earn money?

    mark boardman

    11 Feb 09 at 10:49 am

  2. Nope, sorry, I don’t know of any… I wish I did… but if I did I’d be silly to let everyone else know about it or the work would dry up very quickly, surely?
    It makes logical sense to me that anyone trying to let you know about their “earn money doing nothing” or “get rich quick” scheme is either very stupid or trying to defraud you.
    Employers don’t pay unskilled people loads of money for doing unskilled work (not in the sense we are talking about here, anyway), they especially don’t pay unskilled people for doing nothing.

    Jon

    11 Feb 09 at 7:03 pm

  3. Here is something funny that proves these people as scammers such as http://www.nicksgreen.com.

    Go to http://www.nicksgreen.com it will tell you he is Nick from wherever your IP is based out of, then go to google and choose several proxy sites and use them to go to http://www.nicksgreen.com and you will see Hi am Nick from wherever the proxy comes from.

    ONAIR

    13 Feb 09 at 9:00 pm

  4. Common sense is important here, folks. Think about it the way Jon says – if it really is such a great deal, and a great way of making money, no one would share it.

    There\’s always a bottom line; your just have to look harder for it sometimes.

    Quite frankly, if it sounds too good to be true, it is.

    Bonochromatic

    19 Feb 09 at 7:37 am

  5. Scammy ads are still running on Facebook, here is a screenshot of one from this week (August 2011) but I have seen several different ones over the past year:
    http://img535.imageshack.us/img535/835/workathomescamadsonface.jpg

    The ad goes to this page which is yet another fake news site scam claiming that Google is paying people to work at home:
    fdxnewsonline.com/business/index-16232.php?t202id=2117&c1=FB&c2=SEF&c3=ptv111&c4=

    Rab

    30 Aug 11 at 1:33 am

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